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Claim Preparation

Background

The Law of Tort

Initial Stages

Commencement of Proceedings

Claim Form N1

Money Claim Online

Possession Claim Online

Civil Claims Issue Service Particulars Response

Start of Civil Case

Responding to a Claim

Late Servicing of Defence

Civil Claim Limitation Periods

Joining Participants and Causes of Action

Pre Action Protocol

Mortgage Pre-action Protocol

Rent Pre-action Protocol

Per-action Protocol RTA

Disease Pre-action Protocol

Housing Pre-action Protocol

Construction Pre-action Protocol

Judicial Review of Pre-action Protocol

Clinical Disputes Pre-action Protocol

Professional Negligence Pre-action Protocol

Pre-action Protocol for Personal Injury

Pre-action Protocols for Civil Litigation

Pre-action Protocol for Defamation

Letters of Claim

Letters of Claim for Illness

Letters of Claim for Housing

Letters of Claim for Construction

Letters of Claim for Judicial Review

Letters of Claim for Medical Negligence

Letters of Claim for Professional Negligence

Letters of Claim for Personal Injury

Letters of Claim for Defamation

The Pre-Action Protocol for Professional Negligence Claims sets out details as to what a letter of claim for a professional negligence claim should contain.

The Protocol applies to claims against a professional other than construction professionals (who are covered by the Pre-Action Protocol for Construction and Engineering Disputes) and healthcare providers (who are covered by the Pre-Action Protocol for the Resolution of Clinical Disputes).  

The Protocol does not just apply to negligence claims against professionals. It will also apply to claims against professionals for breach of contract or breach of fiduciary duty.

What are the requirements of the Protocol?

The preliminary notice

The Protocol encourages Claimants, as soon as they decide that there is a reasonable chance that they will bring a claim against a professional, to notify the professional in writing. The Protocol sets out what the preliminary notice should contain. It should be addressed to the professional and should contain the following information:

The identity of the parties

The preliminary notice should state the name of the Claimant and provide the identity of any other parties involved in the dispute or a related dispute.

The grievance

The preliminary notice should provide a brief outline of the Claimant’s grievance against the professional.

The value of the potential claim

The preliminary notice should provide a general indication of the financial value of the potential claim, if it is possible to do so at this stage.

Professional Indemnity Insurers

The preliminary notice should contain a request that the professional informs his professional indemnity insurers, if any, immediately of the existence of the potential claim.

The letter of claim

The Protocol requires a Claimant to send a detailed letter of claim to the professional as soon as he decides that there are grounds for a claim against the professional. The Protocol sets out what the letter of claim should contain.  

The letter of claim will normally be an open letter, as opposed to one which is marked “without prejudice”.  

If Court proceedings are subsequently commenced and the letter of claim differs materially from the Particulars of Claim in those proceedings, the Court may take this into account when deciding the question of costs. 

If the Claimant has sent a letters of claim (or equivalent) to another party in relation to the dispute or a related dispute, a copy of that letter of claim should be sent to the professional with the letter of claim unless the Claimant is claiming against someone else to whom the Pre-Action Protocol for Professional Negligence Claims does not apply. 

The letter of claim should contain the following information:

The identity of the parties

The letter of claim should state the name of the Claimant and provide the identity of any other parties involved in the dispute or a related dispute.

The facts

The letter of claim should contain a clear chronological summary of the facts of the case, including key dates. Key documents should be identified and copies of such documents should accompany the letter of claim.

The allegations against the professional

The letter of claim should set out the allegations against the professional, for example, what he is alleged to have done wrong and/ or what he is alleged not to have done.

Causation

The letter of claim should explain how the alleged error has caused the Claimant loss.

Financial loss suffered by the Claimant

The letter of claim should provide an estimate of the financial loss suffered by the Claimant and should explain how such loss is calculated. Any supporting documents should be identified and copies of such documents should accompany the letter of claim. 

If the Claimant is unable to provide details of his financial loss at this stage, he should explain why and state when he will be in a position to provide the details. The Protocol requires the Claimant to send this information to the professional as soon as is reasonably possible. 

If the Claimant is seeking some form of non-financial redress, this should be made clear in the letter of claim.

Expert evidence

The letter of claim should state whether the Claimant has appointed an expert or not. If the Claimant has appointed an expert, his identity and discipline should be stated together with the date upon which he was appointed.

Professional Indemnity Insurers

The letter of claim should contain a request that a copy of the letter of claim be forwarded immediately to the professional’s insurers, if any.

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