Labelling milk products

The law relating to the labelling of milk products is governed by the following regulations:

  • The Food Labelling Regulations 1996;
  • The Condensed and Dried Milk (England) Regulations 2003;
  • The Condensed and Dried Milk (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2008;
  • The Casein and Caseinates Regulations 1985;
  • The Casein and Caseinates (Amendment) Regulations 1989;
  • The Spreadable Fats (Marketing Standards) and the Milk and Milk Products (Protection of Designations) (England) Regulations 2008.

Labelling raw milk

In addition to the general requirements set out in the Food Labelling Regulations 1996 there are some specific requirements relating to raw milk (excluding raw milk from buffaloes).

It is a requirement that the container in which raw milk is sold be marked or labelled with the words “This milk has not been heat-treated and may therefore contain organisms harmful to health”.

Where raw milk is sold at a catering establishment and is not prepacked it is a requirement that the container in which the milk is sold be labelled or that there be a ticket or notice that is readily discernible by an intending purchaser at the purchase place stating “milk supplied in this establishment has not been heat-treated and may therefore contain organisms harmful to health.

Labelling products consisting of skimmed milk together with non-milk fat

It is a requirement that the container in which any product consisting of skimmed milk together with non-milk fat which is capable of being used as a substitute for milk (other than infant formulas, follow-on formulas and products specially formulated for infants or young children for medical purposes) is sold be prominently marked or labelled with a warning that the product is unfit, or not to be used, as food for babies.

Labelling condensed and dried milk

The following descriptions of products are referred to as “reserved descriptions”:

  • Partly dehydrated milk (condensed / evaporated milk);
  • Totally dehydrated milk (dried milk)

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For more information on:

  • Labelling caseins and caseinates
  • Vitamin content for spreadable fats
  • Failure to comply with the Regulations