Labelling fats and oils

The law relating to the labelling of fats and oils is governed by the Spreadable Fats (Marketing Standards) and the Milk and Milk Products (Protection of Designations) (England) Regulations 2008 and the Food Labelling Regulations 1996, as amended.

The Spreadable Fats (Marketing Standards) and the Milk and Milk Products (Protection of Designations) (England) Regulations 2008 revoked the Milk and Milk Products (Protection of Designations) Regulations 1990, in so far as they applied to England, the Spreadable Fats (Marketing Standards) (England) Regulations 1999 and the Spreadable Fats (Marketing Standards) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2007.

Vitamin content for spreadable fats

Subject to certain exemptions, it is illegal to sell margarine unless in every 100 grams it contains between 800 and 1,000 micrograms of vitamin A and between 7.05 and 8.82 micrograms of vitamin D and a proportionate amount in any part of 100 grams.

The exceptions are as follows:

  • for spreadable fats which are imported into England from another EEA State (other than a member State) in which it was lawfully produced and sold or from another EEA State via another part of the United Kingdom and is suitably labelled to indicate the nature of the spreadable fat;
  • for margarines imported into England from an EEA State in which it was lawfully produced and sold, or from a member State in which it was in free circulation and lawfully sold, or from another part of the United Kingdom in which it was lawfully produced and sold or in free circulation and lawfully sold and is suitably labelled to indicate the nature of the margarine.

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For more information on:

  • Failure to comply with the Regulations